Rainbows

July 29, 2014 — Leave a comment

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See this and 30 more rainbows here

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What our customers are saying…

“Great bracelet! Thank you!” ~ Diane

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What our customers are saying…

“Great piece of jewelry. Love it!” ~ Renee

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Crown Ducal was founded by the A.G. Richardson & Co. Ltd of England in 1915. The company produced a wide variety of tableware over the years. Their famous artist Charlotte Rhead worked for the company and designed several of the company’s patterns that are a favorite amongst collectors.

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One of its patterns however called Bristol wasn’t designed by Rhead instead a Romantic Transferware pattern called Asiatic Pheasant is said to be the basis of Crown Ducal’s Bristol pattern. It was a very popular in the early 19th century. There was a conjecture that Crown Ducal purchased the rights to Asiatic Pheasant and produced it as Bristol.

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The first piece under the name Bristol appeared in the 1920s. Bristol can be found in five different colours pink, blue (a bright cobalt blue), grey-blue, greenish teal and purple. The grey-blue colour is the least popular among collectors and is relatively cheaper. The greenish teal colour is rare and would cost more. The Bristol pattern is prone to staining and this often affects the total value of the piece especially in common pieces.

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Multiple sizes and shapes of coffeepots and tea pots are available in a variety of colours in this pattern alongside side several serving pieces adding to the pattern’s huge following. However collectors are finding it hard to find coffeepots and teapots in pristine condition. It appears that a large number of tea-related pieces have been marketed largely in Europe making them somewhat hard to find elsewhere.

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“Beautiful brooch, Highly recommended.” ~ Maggie

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“These are better than the description! Love them!” ~ Dara

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Sunflowers

July 25, 2014 — Leave a comment

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What our customers are saying…

“The cutest thing ever.” ~ Sally

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Golden Celebration

July 24, 2014 — Leave a comment

Golden Celebration was bred by David Austin in the United Kingdom in 1992. This is possibly the most beautiful golden yellow English rose in commerce. It is classified as a modern shrub by the American Rose Society and is a cross between Charles Austin and Abraham Darby.

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This English rose excels in its vigor making a large upright shrub quicker than most other roses. The three inch flowers are a clean yellow, very double, highly fragrant and are continuously flowering in summer and autumn.

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It has excellent shapely growth, forming a nicely rounded, slightly arching shrub with ample foliage. It is very reliable and easy to grow. An ideal rose to mark any celebration or important event. The flowers are initially Tea-scented but often develop a wonderful combination of sauterne wine and strawberry.

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This rose can be grown in the ground or in a container, it is susceptible to blackspot and requires spring freeze protection.

More info can be found here: Antique Rose Emporium, Help Me Find, Royal Horticultural Society and David Austin Roses.

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What our customers are saying…

“Heavy, solid & well-crafted. Love, love, love!” ~ Lisa

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Violets

July 23, 2014 — Leave a comment

 Purple violets, along with pansies and violas, are members of the Violaceae plant family. Violets are a genus of spring flowering plants with around 400 to 500 species. They are native to temperate Northern Hemisphere and are also distributed in Hawaii, Australasia and the Andes in South America. Some species of Viola are perennials while others are annuals and a few are small shrubs.

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Violets typically have heart-shaped scalloped leaves and a vast majority of the viola species are herbaceous. The flowers are formed from five petals. The shape of the petals and placement defines many species. Violets often bloom in spring, but many species produce self-pollinated flowers in summer and autumn.

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True violets have been known for centuries with ancient Greeks cultivating them about 500BC. Both Greeks and Romans have found many uses for violets including herbal remedies, wine and to sweeten food. The Ancient Greeks considered Violets the symbol of love and fertility.

Violets are easy to cultivate through root cuttings or seeds. They are easily grown in sun or shade and are best grown in the dappled shade of a deciduous tree. Violets like well-drained and fairly rich soil so work in a spade full or two of compost at planting time for best results. Plan violets four to six weeks before your region’s last frost date and plant them 4 to 8 inches apart. Water moderately for they do not need huge amounts of water. Fertilize once after blooming starts. Not all species of violets are desired- wild violets are considered weeds by some people and are regarded as a problem in shady lawns in North America.

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Viola flowers have many uses including being used to decorate salads or in stuffing for poultry or fish. An extract of violets make a sweet syrup used by the French and the Americans to make violet scones and marshmallows. Violets have also been used as a source of scents in the perfume industry.

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“lovely bracelet” ~ Oscar

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Vintage Pyrex

July 22, 2014 — Leave a comment

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“A beautiful piece! Designer is awesome!” ~ Sherrie

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Wildflowers

July 21, 2014 — Leave a comment

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What our customers are saying…

“Beautifully packaged – I could give as a gift!” ~ Peggy

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Cranes

July 20, 2014 — Leave a comment

The cranes are large to very large birds, including the world’s tallest flying birds. There are fifteen species of cranes under four genera and though they look like herons they are completely unrelated. They are easily recognizable for their long legs and long necks. One of the species of cranes, the whooping cranes became the inspiration for the legislation to protect endangered species. In 1940s there were only 15 cranes but now thanks for the efforts of conservationists there are now about 600 today.

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The cranes easily adapt to new surroundings and can adjust their diet and nutrient requirement according to what’s readily available. Their diet ranges from small rodents, amphibians, insects, to berries and plants. When they are in land they feed on seeds, leaves, nuts and acorns, berries, fruit, insects, worms, snails, small reptiles, mammals and birds. In wetlands, roots, rhizomes, tubers, other mollusks, small fish and amphibians are eaten.

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Some of species of crane migrate over long distances while others don’t migrate at all. The plumage of cranes vary by habitat, those living in vast wetlands tend to have more white in their plumage and tend to be bigger. Those living in smaller wetlands tend to have more gray in their plumage and are smaller in size.

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Cranes usually establish long term bonds that may last the lifetime of the birds. Pairs that are successful at breeding will continue to stay together while those that are continuously unsuccessful will part ways and “divorce”. Both sexes raise the young together which stays with them until the next year’s breeding season. Cranes are territorial and it is left to the male to defend the territory. When the male crane dies the female does not linger in the territory for protecting it lies with the male.

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What our customers are saying…

“Absolutely wonderful brooch!” ~ Maggie

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