Archives For Pendants

Feeding the Birds Naturally

November 23, 2014

Keeping the backyard birds fed comes naturally when you plant shrubs that produce edible berries.  Here are a few options to consider.

WINTERBERRY

Winterberry is a deciduous shrub growing to 6-15 feet tall and often as wide. It develops a rounded habit through suckering, eventually growing into a sizeable colony of upright stems. The stems tend to be dark brown and often develop a pleasing gray sheen. The 3 inch long, elliptic, toothed, and pointed leaves vary from light to dark green, taking a yellow hue in autumn. Insignificant flowers appear in May – June and are followed by bright red berries in late summer. The berries, for which the common name was derived, remain after leaf fall and persist into the winter months to provide food for wildlife. Winterberry prefers evenly moist, acid soils in full sun to partial shade.

PHOTO SOURCE:  http://www.field-notebook.com/?p=803

RED TWIG DOGWOOD

Red Twig Dogwoods are the most popular Dogwood shrubs. They show off brightly colored decorative bark in winter when many other plants are resting. Twig color varies from dark maroon to coral to yellow depending on species and variety.   Small white flowers occur in clusters in spring followed by white to blue fruit in late summer.  They are fast growers to 8-12’ tall & wide with dense branching and foliage. A few lower-growing and dwarf forms are available as well. Most grow very fast, are very tough, adapting to many different soils and light conditions and withstanding temperatures as low as -50 degrees.

PHOTO SOURCE:  http://montananaturalist.blogspot.com/2011_02_01_archive.html

Nannyberry

Nannyberry (Viburnum Lentago), also known as Sheepberry or Sweet Viburnum, is shade-tolerant species commonly used as shrub borders, tall barriers, hedges, and windbreaks. It provides seasonal displays of flowers, fruits, and fall leaf color and the fruit are eaten by many species of birds and wildlife.  It is easily transplanted and established and can be propagated by cuttings. Although the growth habit is primarily a multi-stemmed shrub, it can be maintained as a small tree by pruning stems and removing basal suckers.

PHOTO SOURCE:  http://www.onlyfoods.net/nannyberry-viburnum-lentago.html

To learn more about gardening for the birds check out this guide HERE

SHOP BROKEN CHINA GARDEN BIRD JEWELRY HERE

Broken China Jewelry Bluebird Garden Bird Left Facing Sterling Oval Pendant

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What our customers are saying…

Love, love, love it!!!! Beautiful pendant – so stoked. As pictured, and gorgeous! ” ~Roz

Madame Berkeley Rose

November 22, 2014

First introduced in 1899, this blushing tea rose grows 4-6 feet tall and blooms continuously in the warm seasons (although producing smaller blooms in very hot weather).  The stunning salmon pink and apricot blooms have just a bit of gold at the base, and are full and slightly knotted.

 

SOURCE:  http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/rosesant/msg0313513826886.html

SOURCE:  http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/rosesant/msg0214563915277.html

SOURCE:  http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/rosesant/msg0910202115650.html?15

Learn more & find them for sale at the Antique Rose Emporium HERE:  https://www.antiqueroseemporium.com/roses/424/madame-berkeley

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Broken China Jewelry Copeland Spode Jewel Billingsley Rose Pink Rose Sterling Pendant

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What our customers are saying…

Recycled pieces of old china, perfectly cut and mounted on quality silver in timeless designs – what could be more special? A unique and lovely gift well worth the price. Couldn’t be happier!” ~ Michele

Fun & Funny Garden Birds

November 16, 2014

 

So Funny #birds, #bestofpinterest, #Hodgepodge, https://facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=106186096099420

SOURCE:  http://aunatural.tumblr.com/post/15115539497/nezartdesign-via-nezart-design

 

SOURCE:  http://followthewestwind.tumblr.com/

No matter how hard life gets, hang in there!

SOURCE:  http://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_journal_individual.asp?blog_id=5581538

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Broken China Jewelry Kingfisher Bird with Fish Sterling Oval Pendant

See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“WOW! Fabulous pendant, just love it!” ~ Pamela



Fall Beauty

November 14, 2014

SOURCE:  http://www.midwestliving.com/garden/featured-gardens/garden-tour-autumn-alfresco/page/0/0

DIY:: {25} Fall Centerpiece Ideas

SOURCE:  http://www.hometalk.com/b/148645/25-fall-centerpiece-ideas

Warm Colors in the Garden

SOURCE:  http://imgfave.com/view/4085473?r=pin

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Broken China Jewelry Pheasant Bird Oval Sterling Pendant

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What our customers are saying…

“Charming!! Simply charming.” ~ Sherry

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Tea Potted Plants

November 13, 2014

SOURCE:  http://tinywhitedaisies.tumblr.com/post/3269415266

Flowers planted in tea pot for some vintage charm

SOURCE:  http://weheartit.com/entry/91441957/explore?context_user=doo0dette&page=14

Teapot plants.

SOURCE:  http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/19/44/ad/1944adaf7f0ad6592482c0c44eef8e96.jpg

CLICK HERE FOR MORE OLD COUNTRY ROSES BROKEN CHINA JEWELRY

Broken China Jewelry Old Country Roses Red Yellow Double Rose Close Up Sterling Heart Pendant

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What our customers are saying…

“Unique item made of high quality materials. Very creative. Fast shipping and lovely packaging. Will be a repeat customer!” ~ Meloni

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Want more creative potted plant ideas?  Click HERE to check out this book



Kazanlik Rose

September 6, 2014

Kazanlik is perhaps the most sought after of Damask roses, also known as Trigintipetala. It was introduced in Germany by Dr. Georg Dieck in 1889 as ‘Rosa damascena var. trigintipetala’ and is now grown in great quantity in Bulgaria, known for rose exportation afar.

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The flowers are deep pink, with thirty petals arranged in a somewhat shaggy halo around golden stamens. The dark green shrub is vigorous and not as open as in some varieties of Damasks. It has light green foliage armed with thorns, with strong fragrance and is an occasional repeat bloomer later in the season.

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This rose blooms on old wood and to encourage repeat bloom, prune after flowering.

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Content Sources: Antique Rose Emporium and Help Me Find.

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What our customers are saying…

“I received the item quickly and more than love it.” ~ Kathy

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The Science of Rose Colors

September 3, 2014

The colors of a rose are based on which color wavelengths are absorbed and which colors are reflected back. The natural colors of roses range through a diverse palette and exist to attract pollinators. The colors originate from the petal cells where sugar-based pigments reflect light to the viewer. Conditions that concern propagation including genetics, lighting and temperature influence the color variation in roses.

Among the natural colors to choose from are pink, yellow, red or white colored roses. Some striped or splotched roses occur naturally in the wild however no true black or blue rose exist in nature. Breeders try to expand the color range of roses when they combine species of roses to see new color combination in the offspring flowers.

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Some wild roses display pink petals with red splotches or stripes as seen in Rose Mundi. The Rugosa roses naturally occur in shades of white, yellow, pink and reddish purple. When a China Butterfly Rose’s petals are aging the color range would go from yellow to pink and then to crimson red.

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There are rose species with extraordinary color changing qualities responding to light and temperature like the phototropic Double Delight Rose that changes from white to cherry red in response to variations of light. A Rugosa rose, Agnes is thermotropic changing its color in response to heat to yellow blossoms and changing to red apricot in cool weather.

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No rose or flower is truly black as no flower absorbed all the light so nothing is reflected back. The flower would have to have pigments for red, blue and green to it to be black.

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“Beautiful and well packaged. Very pleased.” ~ Lynn

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General Schablikine Rose

August 30, 2014

General Schablikine was bred in by Gilbert Nabannond in France and named for a Russian General living and/or holidaying on the French Rivera. It is sometimes referred to as ‘Vestey’s Pink Tea’. This lovely old Tea Rose makes an upright bushy shrub that is seldom out of bloom. The blooms are very double, cherry to coppery-red that open from rather long buds to nearly flats.

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The growth habit of General Schablikine is bushy and upright, growing to 5′ or 6′ in height. General Schablikine is unusually well-foliated with medium green and smooth leaves. It is seldom out of bloom during the growing season and has a good tea fragrance. General Schablikine is a very useful rose, with very double flowers that open flat. General Schablikine is a very hardy and disease free rose, it is easily propagated by cuttings and requires sunny locations to thrive. It is suitable for growing in pots and in greenhouses.

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A quote from Henry Charles Brougham about General Schablikine and the qualities of this beautiful Tea Rose, “If a law was passed that one man should cultivate but one variety of rose, I should without hesitation choose General Schablikine ; for general utility it is without rival, flowering continuously from October to Summer, flowers of fine shape and wonderful evenness, a hundred blooms could be gathered off one plant, and everyone exactly resembling its neighbor; the flower-stalk was a peculiar curve, which identifies it from other sorts. But little is known in England, which is surprising, as its good constitution and hardiness would almost guarantee success in a colder and gloomier climate. This of all roses serves us the most faithfully and generously.”

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Content Sources: Antique Rose Emporium, Rose Petal Nursery and Peaceful Habitations Rose Gardens.

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“Good quality work” ~ Cheyenne

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Breakfast Breads

August 26, 2014

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Raspberry Lemon Muffins

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Buttermilk Blueberry Breakfast Cake

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Toasted Coconut Pound Cake

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What our customers are saying…

“This is a lovely and colorful pendant! The store owner is very professional and packaged this item very well. It arrived promptly!” – Monica

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Clarice Cliff

August 24, 2014

Clarice Cliff was born on January 20, 1899 in Meir Street, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent England. Her father Harry worked at a local iron foundry in Tunstall and her mother Ann took in washing to supplement the family income. She was the middle of seven children. She started working in the pottery industry as a gilder at the age of 13. At the age of 17, she switched to different pottery company and apprenticed for A.J. Wilkinson. She was rather ambitious and chose to acquire various skills instead of maximizing on one. In the early 1920s, her immediate boss brought her to the attention of one of the factory owners, Colley Shorter who noticed her artistic skills.

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By 1924, at the age of 25, she worked as a modeler but also worked with factory designers John Butler and Fred Ridgway. They produced conservative Victorian style ware and she was allowed to decorate some of the defective pieces with her own freehand patterns. She covered the defective pieces with simple triangle designs in bright colours calling the style Bizarre. To the surprise of everybody it was an instant hit. Clarice was then joined by Glady Scarlett who helped her decorate more wares.

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In March 1927, Colley Shorter sent Clarice to the Royal College Art for two periods of study in March and May. From 1927 onwards, Clarice was credited for shapes she designed, the designs she produced from 1929 onwards were considered more modern and was later termed Art Deco. In 1928, she produced a simple hand painted pattern of the Crocus flower in orange. She only had one other decorator produce the Crocus pattern but by 1930s the orders skyrocketed that they needed more decorators to produce the piece. Her team of decorators had grown to a team of 70 young painters mainly women who she calls her Bizarre Girls.

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In 1920, she was appointed art director to Newport Pottery and A.J. Wilkinson, the two factories producing her wares. Together with Colley Shorter they worked closely to catch the attention of buyers in the middle of a major economic depression. Between 1929 and 1935, she produced a mass range of shapes, Conical, Bon Jour/Biarritz, Stamford, Eton, Daffodil, and Trieste. All designs were well received that even through the depths of depression she was able to sell volumes. Her Bizarre and Fantastique ware was sold throughout America, New Zealand, Australia and South Africa.

After the death of Colley Shorter’s wife in 1940, he married Clarice who then moved into his home in Staffordshire. During World War II only plain white pottery was permitted so Clarice assisted with management and focused her artistic energy on gardening at the 4 acre garden at Chetwynd House. When her husband died in 1963, Clarice sold the factory to Midwinter in 1964. Clarice died on October 23, 1972.

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“I love the pendant. First class. Thank you for the fast service.” ~ Maggie

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