Archives For Blue and White

Transferware

June 29, 2014

A technique of “printing” designs on ceramics (china) was developed in Staffordshire, England around 1760 called transferware.  It was developed by John Sadler and Guy Green of Liverpool. Transfer printing became the answer to providing an affordable alternative to the hand painted pieces that were very expensive that only the wealthy could afford.

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The transfer process begins when a design is etched on a flat copper plate then the copper plate is inked with ceramic coloring. After the plate is thoroughly inked the design would then be transferred to a tissue paper. The inked impression would then be transferred to the ceramic object. After the ceramic object is inked it would be taken to a low-temperature kiln to get fired and glazed to fix the design.

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Transfer printing was originally done in single colors and the popular ones were blue, red, black, purple, green and brown. Blue pieces were the most sought after and the browns ones were considered the cheapest. The transfer printing technique was later adapted by Josiah Wedgwood in the creation of his ivory based ceramics called “Creamware”. Years later the technique advanced and allowed for the printing of double and triple colors, combinations like red and white and blue and white.

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The transferware designs and patterns are varied but they often incorporate Asian people and scenery with beautiful pagodas. English manufacturers of transferware include Crown Ducal, Enoch Wood, Royal Staffordshire, Royal Crownford, Alfred Meakin, Spode, Johnson Brothers, and Mason’s with most sought after patterns including Crown Ducal’s “Bristol”, “Calico”, “Castles”, “Charlotte”, “English Chippendale”, “English Scenery”, “Friendly Village”, “Historic America”, “Italian”, “Liberty Blue”, “Old Britain Castles”, “Rose Chintz”, “Tonquin”, “Tower” and Vista”.

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When collecting transferware pieces it would be advantageous to be familiar with how to date and identify an original. It is important to note the difference in marks or backstamps between time periods. From 1842 to 1883, the items carried a diamond shaped mark which contains the date the pattern was registered. After 1884, the registry adapted single numbers and registration numbers higher than 360,000 denote creation after the 1900s. Around 1860 to 1880 the word Limited or its abbreviations Lt or Ltd was added and the word Trademark was added and indicates a manufacture date after 1875. The words “Made in England” denotes the piece is created sometime in the 20th century.

Pieces from the 1700s as well as 1800s are hard to come by and aren’t usually found in antique shops but they do show up from time to time. We can readily find red and white transferware pieces in malls and online shops and though they are not valuable the designs are just as beautiful as the antique ones.

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What our customers are saying…

“bracelet is beautiful! Thank you!” ~ Mandy

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Vintage Swimwear

June 28, 2014

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“The jewelry is just a beautiful in person as described .” ~ Donnie

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Blue Willow China

June 18, 2014

 The Blue Willow pattern is perhaps the most easily recognizable pattern and the oldest china pattern to still be reproduced today. It was created in England around 1780 but its roots in China are older. In the 18th century, China has started a booming export business with the European market which then expanded to the America. One of the items they exported was the highly popular china tableware in blue and white pattern which gained a following in Europe for its beautiful design and durability.

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The first blue willow china pieces were sold by Chinese traders to wealthy clients and it is said that Queen Mary II started her own collection and that she had a special cabinet made to store all of her porcelain from China. The English potters having gained knowledge of how to produce these wares made an effort to compete with these Chinese imports.

The first Blue Willow design was created by Thomas Turner having been inspired by the blue and white patterns of the wares from China and Thomas Minton was credited as the first to do the copper engraving for Turner.

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The traditional features of the Blue Willow patterns are a Chinese pagoda (called tea house by some) and garden, an oriental bridge with three people walking, the willow tree, and of course the two birds. There is a legend behind the pattern which is most likely an English romantic rumor that tells the story of a rich Mandarin who has a beautiful daughter that fell in love the Mandarin’s secretary. The difference in their social status prevented the daughter and the secretary from getting married and to prevent their meetings the rich Mandarin had a high fence built to keep the lovers from seeing each other.

The daughter was betrothed to marry a duke who came by boat with a box of jewels, on the eve of their wedding the daughter and the secretary ran away and sailed on the boat to a secluded land where they lived happily for many years. The secretary became a famous writer which later proved to be the key to his doom as his fame allowed the rich Mandarin to find him and have him and the daughter killed. It was said that the gods took pity on the lovers and transformed them into birds. Some sources state that the two birds were not part of the original design and was only added later to add romance and allure to the legend.

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The Victorians loved the pattern and so several well-known potters began to reproduce their own version of the Blue Willow. Notable potteries include:

  • Worcester who pioneered with the blue and white hand painted ware later perfecting a printing technique making the blue and white print transfer ware.
  • Thomas Minton, the first engraver of Turner’s designed later merged with Royal Doulton who also produced their version of the Blue Willow, between the late 18th Century up to 1960s.
  • Spode and Copeland produced the popular Willow Nankin and Blue Willow transferware
  • Johnson brothers (now part of the Wedgwood Group) started producing Blue Willow in 1883 and continues on today.

The popularity of the Blue Willow had waned at some point but Blue Willow transferware from Japan reintroduced the pattern and it has been amongst the popular patterns ever since.

With the abundance of Blue Willow pieces being produced worldwide it isn’t hard for collectors and starting collectors to begin or expand their collection.

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

 “beautiful”  ~ Micah

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Blue and White China

June 2, 2014


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Blue-Willow-Blue Willow Broken China Jewelry

See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“Beautiful items!!” ~ Jayce

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Happy Daffodils

April 7, 2014

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SOURCE: http://www.marthastewart.com/275147/best-of-easter-workshop-2008delightful-d?lpgStart=1&currentslide=2&currentChapter=1#/195422

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SOURCE: http://tradgardsflow.blogspot.com/search/label/April

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

The pendant is beautiful ” ~Michelle

Wallpaper or Plates?

April 5, 2014

Can you tell which of these pictures is real plates and which is wallpaper?

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P.S. This one is the wallpaper and the top picture is actual plates.  Both are lovely!

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“Love it! Beautifully made and will be my go to piece of jewelry.” – Andre

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Easter Tables

March 29, 2014

Architecture Art Designs shared 28 inspirational tables on their site and I had a hard time picking my favorites! Check out all 28 here.

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“Exquisite pendant. Given as a gift and very well received!”– Deborah

 


Blue & White Tea Party

March 25, 2014

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See more lovely broken china jewelry in our shop HERE.

What our customers are saying…

“Very pretty and such wonderful quality.” – Stephanie

Spode Blue Italian

January 28, 2014

 Ever wanted to know more about Spode Blue Italian china?

According to this blogger:

Tilman Lichtenthaeler, a Spode collector and researcher, carried out an architectural quest to trace the building types in an attempt to unravel the mystery of the source of the Italianscene. He found there is no one place in Italy that corresponds to all the features included in the picture. The scene is a composition made up of several elements. The ruin on the left, although architecturally incorrect, might have been based on the Great Bath at Tivoli, near Rome. The row of houses along the left bank of the river is similar to those of the Latium area near Umbria, north of Rome. The castle in the distance is of a type which occurs only in Northern Italy in the regions of Piedmont and Lombardy.

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SOURCE: http://bluepueblo.tumblr.com/post/10898575003/isle-of-capri-italy-photo-via-courtney

 The suggestion is that a travelling artist from Northern Europe made sketches of the scenes he encountered as he made his way through Italy. On his return home the sketches were combined into an attractive scene which, later, Spode used and chose to call the Italian Pattern. It is not possible to date this. There may even have been a print from a painting and then another painting taken from the print by a different artist…..

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SOURCE: http://www.replacements.com/thismonth/archive/v806b.htm

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SOURCE: https://www.etsy.com/shop/vbellejewelry/search?search_query=italian&order=date_desc&view_type=gallery&ref=shop_search

Sunflowers and Butterflies

January 27, 2014

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SOURCE: https://www.etsy.com/listing/165326168/broken-china-jewelry-amber-butterfly?ref=shop_home_active&ga_search_query=yellow