Archives For China Patterns

Mountain Bluebirds

November 3, 2016

The mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is a medium-sized bird weighing about 1.1 oz with a length from 6–8 in. They have light underbellies and black eyes. Adult males have thin bills and are bright turquoise-blue and somewhat lighter underneath. Adult females have duller blue wings and tail, grey breast, grey crown, throat and back. In fresh fall plumage, the female’s throat and breast are tinged with red-orange, brownish near the flank contrasting with white tail underparts.

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MALE &FEMALE Mountain Bluebirds:

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Image Source: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_bluebird/id

The mountain bluebird is just as “western” as the Western Bluebird, but the two species occupy different habitats in summer. The Western is more of a forest bird, the Mountain more partial to open habitats: high sagebrush desert, mountain meadows, and even alpine tundra.

Interested in more bluebird articles, see our links below for more great information.

Bluebirds: http://vbelleblog.com/2014/03/05/bluebirds/

Bluebird China History: http://vbelleblog.com/2014/03/07/bluebird-china-history/

Vintage Bluebird Greetings!  http://vbelleblog.com/2014/11/29/vintage-bluebird-greetings/

Bluebird Search http://vbelleblog.com/?s=bluebird

Image result for mountain bluebird

Image result for mountain bluebird

Broken_China_Jewelry_Birds

 

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“Just like the bluebirds in my back yard” ~ Michelle J.

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Stunning Planters!

June 28, 2016

If you want to get creative with your outdoor space this summer, you can use your imagination to make some simple and clean planters.

Below are examples of beautiful plant combinations & some are in very unique planters.  Enjoy the inspiration!

Image Source: https://www.facebook.com/ubdlandscaping

Image Source: http://www.lowes.com/creative-ideas/lawn-and-garden/tree-stump-container-garden/article

Image Source: http://diyhealth.tips/i-love-this-idea-make-stunning-planters-using-tree-stumps-and-logs/

Image Source:  http://www.keystonepaving.ca/planters/

 

Broken China Jewelry Portmeirion Botanic Garden Belladonna Lily Flower Sterling Circle Pendant

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“I love their botanic garden collection”  Vivian M.

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Butterfly ‘Anouk’ Lavender (also knows as Spanish or French lavender), is a hardy, drought tolerant, deer resistant shrub with highly aromatic flowers and foliage.  It has a long blooming season from late spring to late summer and forms bushy mounds that can reach 18″ tall by 24″ wide.  This showy lavender does best is full sun with well-drained soil, either in pots or in the ground.  Mass plantings create a spectacular show and will be a magnet for butterflies.

Image Source:  https://www.gardenia.net/rendition.slider_detail/uploads/plant/1431363979-b80dd4dbf1d64cc7a/7163720_m.jpg

Find Anouk Lavender for sale: Click HERE & HERE to buy!

Image Source:  https://static.99roots.com/uploads/images/Lavandula-stoechas-Alexandra_4913_1280_1280.jpg

58.1 Lilacs

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“Absolutely beautiful workmanship, this is just stunning!”.  Tori W.

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Encouraging Women to Propose on Leap Day: How did it start?

The legend goes that St. Bridget of Ireland was frustrated that all the non-nun ladies in 5th century Ireland had to sit around waiting for proposals that might never come. She complained about it to St. Patrick who, probably impressed by Bridget’s ability to turn her used bathwater into beer, finally proclaimed that women could have the chance to propose themselves once every four years on the leap day. This became known as “The Ladies’ Privilege.”

Data Source: http://mentalfloss.com/article/30102/ladies-privilege-encouraging-women-propose-leap-day

Leap_Year

Images Sourced: http://hubpages.com/holidays/Doomsday-Leap-Year-and-Sadie-Hawkins-Day#

Image Source: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/88/1c/bb/881cbb8932043fd37a71094c57c75e49.jpg

 

Who’s done it?

A handful of famous women have proposed to their husbands, although sadly none that we can find on a leap day.

In 1839 Queen Victoria proposed to Albert, a situation necessitated by the fact that she held a much higher rank than him. Victoria recorded in her diary,

“At about half past 12 I sent for Albert; he came to the [room] where I was alone, and after a few minutes I said to him, that I thought he must be aware of why I wished [him] to come here, and that it would make me too happy if he would consent to what I wished (to marry me); we embraced each other over and over again, and he was so kind, so affectionate…I told him I was quite unworthy of him and kissed his dear hand.”

Zsa Zsa Gabor has claimed that she proposed to all of her nine husbands. The first proposal was when she was only 15 years old, to her 35-year-old boyfriend, a Turkish official named Burhan Asaf Belge. It was Gabor’s parents who provided the ring, sporting a ten carat diamond, for their daughter.

More recently, celebrities such as Halle Berry, Jennifer Hudson, Heather Mills, and the singer Pink have admitted to proposing to their husbands (or ex-husbands).

Broken_China_Jewelry

 

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“Absolutely stunning, I love showing off my beautiful pendant.

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Daylily is a flowering plant in  genus Hemerocallis. It has been described by garden enthusiasts as “the backbone of the perennial garden” however though backbone would generally mean as fragile things, daylilies are anything but, they are close to being indestructible. They thrive in a wide range of soils and in sun or partial shade. Professional horticulturist have long bred daylily species for their attractive flowers. Daylily is native to Eurasia including China, Korea and Japan and it is popular worldwide because of the showy flwoers and hardiness of many kinds. Around the world there are over 60,000 registered cultivars, hundred have fragrant flowers and more scented cultivars are appearing more frequently in northern hybridization programs.

Image Source: http://www.distinctly.on.ca/floydcove/Picassos_Intrigue.html

Since the early 1930s, hybridizers in the United States and England have made great improvements in daylilies. Originally, the only colors were yellow, orange, and fulvous red. Today, we have colors ranging from near-whites, pastels, yellows, oranges, pinks, vivid reds, crimson, purple, nearly true-blue, and fabulous blends. Many people are familiar with only the common yellow or orange daylilies which are often seen along roadsides.

 

For planting daylilies, select a site with full sun to light shade and well-drained soil. In areas with hot summers, light afternoon shade will keep brightly colored flowers from fading. Plant in spring, spacing the plants 1 to 3 feet apart. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 inches, then mix in a 2 to 4 layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.

 

The wise daylily gardener will apply a proper cultural program which includes watering, fertilizing, mulching, possibly spraying, grooming, controlling weeds, and sanitation. Daylilies can be quite prone to pests and disease when they get old and lose vigour. You can prevent this by dividing clumps every other year in either spring or autumn. The problems to watch out for are rust, spider mite, thrips and aphids. Slugs and snails can also be a problem.

 

You can purchase Daylily Picasso’s Intrigue from the following:

 

eBay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Daylily-Seeds-The-Big-Picture-x-Picassos-Intrigue-6-Seeds-/151633370816

Riverbend Gardens & Nursery: http://riverbendgardens.net/daylilies

Guidry’s Daylily Garden, LLC: http://www.patrickguidry.com/new-images-04-5.html

Jardins Shefford: http://www.jardinsshefford.com/hemerocalle_pq.php

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Artistry Rose

July 26, 2015

Artistry Rose was bred by  Dr. Keith W. Zary in the United States and introduced in the US by Bear Creek Gardens, Inc. it is a Hybrid Tea Rose that will grow to be about 5 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 4 feet. Its foliage tends to remain dense right to the ground, not requiring facer plants in front. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 20 years. This award winning rose lights up the garden with loads of vibrant coral-orange flowers in early summer, repeat-blooming; compact and low-growing, also tolerant to heat, excellent for garden detail use; needs full sun and well-drained soil.

Image Source: http://tulsagentleman.blogspot.com/2010/10/sooc-sunday-artistry-rose.html

Image Source: http://41.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m3kdmfXCGC1rtrdnoo1_1280.jpg

Artistry Rose is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition. Hybrid Tea Roses are not hardy and require substantial care and winter protection to survive in the North and much of the Midwest.  It will require regular care and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed and to encourage new growth.

It is suitable for mass planting, hedges or screening and as an accent plant. It can also be grown in the ground or in a container.

The Artistry Rose can be purchased from

Heirloom Roses – http://www.heirloomroses.com/roses/shrub-roses/antique-artistry.html

 

 

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Portmeirion Pottery, a British pottery founded in 1960 by Susan William Ellis and her husband Euan Cooper Ellis, created the Botanic Garden china pattern. In 1970s, Susan and Euan visited an antiquarian bookshop in London and while browsing through 18th century engravings of sea creatures to decorate her pottery, the shop keeper showed her a book called The Universal Herbal published in 1817 by Thomas Green.  The illustrations in the book were vibrant and full of color that it triggered an inspiration in Susan prompting her creative talents to kick in and allowing her to envision a wide range of tableware featuring different flowers on each piece.

On their way back, book in tow Susan continued to envision the next design line and had decided that this collection would be manufactured on a variation of Meridian shapes which has just recently designed. She continued to search for books with botanical motifs and came across the book “The Moral of Flowers” which contained poems and prose for 48 different plants from oaks to daisies. Susan sought the help of Mr. William Clarke, a highly regarded draughtsman and former employee of the Horticultural Society to illustrate those plants. Mr. Clarke’s illustrations were perfect for what Susan had envisioned that she purchased several more books that contain Mr. Clarke’s illustrations. Later on she decided to add butterflies and other insects to her designs to give it variety and to bring the range together she added the triple leaf border.

The design range is then named The Botanic Garden after an 18th century poem by Erasmus Darwin. Botanic Garden was officially launched in 1972 and has since then been loved worldwide, a serene and comforting presence amidst the increasing busyness of our everyday lives.

 

 

Broken China Jewelry Portmeirion Botanic Garden Belladonna Lily Flower Sterling Large Oval Pendant

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“Portmerion is my favorite!” ~ Jeanette L.

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Depression era Glass

June 15, 2015

Learning to live on little or nothing was the way of life for many families for a decade or more beginning in 1929. Times were tough during the Great Depression, in the United States and Canada depression glassware were distributed for free or at a low cost. Depression glass is clear or colored translucent glassware, a subset of Uranium Glass. It is very popular due to its affordability and availablity. It can be used daily or for special occasions and comes in an array of elegant colors. Depression Glassware was made in the US from the early 1920s all the way through to the end of World War II. It was the first machine produced mass made and nationally produced glassware in America. Majority of depression glass is colored though there were many clear patterns, some opaque and some with metallic accents or decorations. Even in the late 1950s several patterns were still produced due to its massive popularity.

Depression Glassware started out as a promotional item or an incentive to purchase products.  The Quaker Oats Company, and other food manufacturers and distributors, put a piece of glassware in boxes of food, as an incentive to purchase. Movie houses would distribute a piece for simply going in, gas stations also give them out to attract customers. There were over 100 companies producing glasswares before the depression but after the depression there were only half that number. Most of the production of the depression glass took place in the Ohio River Valley where access to raw materials were inexpensive.  More than twenty manufacturers made more than 100 patterns, and entire dinner sets were made in some patterns. Common colors are clear (crystal), pink, pale blue, green, and amber. Less common colors include yellow (canary), ultramarine, jadeite (opaque pale green), delphite (opaque pale blue), cobalt blue, red (ruby & royal ruby), black, amethyst, monax, and white (milk glass).

Image Source: http://www.depressionelegantglass.com/dogwood-pink-depression-glass-lunch-pink-saturday/

Glassware produced during that era has been divided into two type: depression glass and elegant glass. Elegant glass as the name suggests is of superior and elegant quality with a definitive detail that went into the finishing of the product. It was distributed through jewelry and department stores from the 1920s through the 1950s, and was an alternative to fine china. Most of the elegant glassware manufacturers had closed by the end of the 1950s, when cheap glassware and imported china replaced Elegant glass. Depression glass on the other hand had a bit more crude and simple finishing although elaborate details were added after it was made. The rough edges from left from the molds were not polished down as compared to the elegant glass.

Image Source: http://www.depressionelegantglass.com/tisket-tasket-green-baskets-flowers-lorain-depression-glass/

The production process of depression glass was very rudimentary so flaws were common such as straw marks, rough edges or a piece may lean to one side. Straw marks have been mistaken for cracks but they really are just lines occurring on the surface of the glass during the manufacturing process. The rough edges were caused by the seams in the molds which were not polished down so as to save production costs hereby making the finished item affordable. These characteristics are common and have been accepted by collectors as part of depression glass.

With the advancement of technology and availability of advance machinery it is now quite easy to reproduce depression glassware’s that were knowingly or unknowingly passed off as originals by wholesalers and retailers worldwide. These reproductions look like the originals that even the most experienced collector could be fooled. Patience and thorough examination of each item is needed to ascertain its authenticity.

 

Broken China Jewelry Fire King Pale Green Jadeite Sterling Drop Pendant

 

 

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In a world of decreasing garden space, living garden walls are becoming popular world wide as way of increasing our green space. They can be indoors or out, in small courtyards, replace art work or make a grand statement, they are versatile and irresistible.

Data Source: http://www.earthandwater.com.au/content/page/living-garden-walls.html

Image Source: http://www.thegreenhead.com/2009/03/living-wall-planter-large-vertical-garden.php

Image Source: http://www.earthandwater.com.au/content/page/living-garden-walls.html

 

Broken China Boehm Blue Hen Chicken & Peach Blossom Flower (Delaware) Sterling Circle Pendant

 

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“I love my new jewelry, my daughter found this unique jewelry and I just love it. ” ~ Alexis M.

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History of Globes

May 13, 2015

Written evidence suggests that people have used globes to model the world around them since antiquity; Strabo (63/64BCE-24CE) reported that Crates of Mallos had a globe of the equivalent of 10 feet in diameter. Globes are delicate, though, and the surviving evidence for early globe use is sparse. The earliest globe that survives today was made in 1492 by Martin Behaim, a German navigator and geographer in the employ of King João II of Portugal. Behaim’s globe recorded not only the lie of the lands being discovered by seabourne explorers, but also details of overseas commodities, market places and local trading protocols. Thus, the earliest surviving globe, which probably reflects many others produced around the same time, features information on more than cartography.

Data Source: http://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/whipple/explore/globes/abriefhistoryofglobes/

English globe by Joseph Moxon

Image 1 The English Globe by Joseph Moxon, 1679. The globe’s sphere was stationary above a planisphere drawn up for the latitude of London.Image © the Whipple Museum (Wh.1466).

Globes retained their decorative function in the 17th century, and some innovative designs were produced that promoted the gentlemanly use of globes as accessories or furniture items. Pocket globes were first produced in England by Joseph Moxon XR  (1627-1691) in 1673, and gentlemen might well have used these miniature instruments as status symbols. Moxon also collaborated with Roger Palmer XR  to make the ‘English Globe’ in 1679 (Image 1), which was best used in the garden. Indeed, the fact that the ‘English globe’ could not be rotated on its stand meant that it could only be used for latitudes matching that of the south of England and would have been useless on sea voyages. Pocket globes and instruments such as the ‘English globe’ meant that makers could promote globes among new audiences.

 

(Above) The early sixteenth-century engraved ostrich egg globe among other ostrich eggs. Photo: Washington Map Society.  Asia on the ostrich egg globe, showing the large peninsula jutting southward at the right which is evidence of the influence of Henricus Martellus. Photo: Washington Map Society.

Image Source: http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/26763

The Lenox Globe (above) is often referred to as the oldest extant post-Columbian globe.  The globe itself, measuring only 5 inches/12.7 cm in diameter, is an engraved copper ball of excellent workmanship.  It was found in Paris in 1850 by the architect, Richard M. Hunt, and was presented by him to James Lenox the founder of the Lenox Library. It is now a prized possession of the New York Public Library, of which the Lenox Library now forms a part. The small globe is composed of two copper-engraved hemispheric sections closely fitted along the equator, as in the case of the Ulpius Globe (#367), and pierced for an axis. Whatever mountings it may have had are lost. It may once have even formed a part of an astronomical clock. A very similar globe, belonging to an astronomical clock and apparently of about the same age as theLenox Globe, is in the library of the Jagiellon University at Cracow in Poland.

Data Source: http://cartographic-images.net/Cartographic_Images/314_Lenox_Globe.html

 

Broken China Jewelry - Brown Tonquin Franciscan - Sterling Silver Pin Brooch

 

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